top of page
  • Writer's pictureTricia Schmorde

Shiba Inu's used as Therapy Dogs

hiba Inus can make great therapy dogs for the right person or situation. However, it is important to note that not all Shiba Inus are suited for this type of work, and extensive training and socialization is required. Shiba Inus are known for their independence and can be stubborn, which can make training a challenge. However, with patience and positive reinforcement training, they can learn to be well-behaved and obedient. One of the main benefits of using a Shiba Inu as a therapy dog is their small size. They are considered a medium-sized breed, but are on the smaller side, which makes them easy to handle and transport. They are also known for their calm and gentle demeanor, which can be very soothing for people in need of emotional support. Shiba Inus are also very adaptable and can thrive in a variety of environments. This makes them well-suited for therapy work in places like hospitals, nursing homes, and schools. Overall, if you are interested in using a Shiba Inu as a therapy dog, it is important to do your research and find a reputable breeder who breeds for temperament and health. You will also need to invest in proper training and socialization to ensure that your Shiba Inu is well-behaved and comfortable in a therapy setting. shiba inu example being used as a therapy dog Here's an example of how a Shiba Inu was used as a therapy dog: In 2019, a Shiba Inu named Pepper was certified as a therapy dog and began visiting patients at St. Joseph's Children's Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Pepper's owner, Stefanie Cates, trained her to be a therapy dog after realizing how much joy Pepper brought to people when they saw her in public. During her visits, Pepper would visit with children who were recovering from surgeries or other medical procedures. She would sit quietly next to them, allowing them to pet and cuddle her, which helped to reduce their anxiety and provide a sense of comfort. Pepper's gentle demeanor and calm personality made her a favorite among the hospital staff and patients. Her visits were so popular that the hospital began featuring her on their social media pages to help spread the word about the benefits of animal-assisted therapy. Overall, Pepper was a shining example of how a Shiba Inu can make a great therapy dog with the right training and socialization. Shiba Inu example as a health therapy dog Here is an example of how a Shiba Inu was used as a health therapy dog: In 2018, a Shiba Inu named Kiku was certified as a health therapy dog and began visiting residents at a senior living facility in Iowa. Kiku's owner, Karen Veeder, trained her to be a therapy dog after noticing how much her Shiba Inu loved to interact with people. During her visits, Kiku would go from room to room, visiting with residents who were dealing with various health issues. She would sit on their beds or in their laps, allowing them to pet and cuddle her. Many of the residents looked forward to Kiku's visits and said that spending time with her helped to boost their mood and reduce their stress levels. In addition to visiting with residents one-on-one, Kiku also participated in group activities such as bingo games and exercise classes. Her presence helped to create a sense of community and brought a smile to many faces. Overall, Kiku was a great example of how a Shiba Inu can be an effective health therapy dog. Her friendly and affectionate nature helped to improve the quality of life for many seniors and provided a much-needed source of comfort and companionship. shiba inu diabetic detection dog While Shiba Inus are not commonly trained as diabetic detection dogs, it is possible for them to be trained for this purpose. Diabetic detection dogs are trained to detect changes in their handler's blood sugar levels, and alert them when their levels are too high or too low. Here is an example of a Shiba Inu who was trained as a diabetic detection dog: In 2014, a Shiba Inu named Kuma became a diabetic alert dog for his owner, a young girl named Bella who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Kuma was trained to detect changes in Bella's blood sugar levels by using his sense of smell. During his training, Kuma was taught to recognize the scent of the chemicals that are released by the body when blood sugar levels change. When Kuma detects a change in Bella's scent, he alerts her by pawing at her leg or barking. Kuma's alerts have helped Bella to manage her diabetes more effectively and have prevented her from experiencing dangerous highs or lows. Kuma has also become a beloved member of the family, providing Bella with companionship and emotional support. While Shiba Inus are not typically used as diabetic detection dogs, Kuma's story shows that with the right training and socialization, any breed of dog can be trained to perform this important role. shiba inu as siezure detection dog in human While Shiba Inus are not commonly trained as seizure detection dogs, it is possible for them to be trained for this purpose. Seizure detection dogs are trained to detect changes in their handler's body language or behavior, and alert them or others when a seizure is about to occur. Here is an example of a Shiba Inu who was trained as a seizure detection dog: In 2017, a Shiba Inu named Hiro became a seizure alert dog for his owner, a young girl named Lily who has epilepsy. Hiro was trained to detect changes in Lily's body language and behavior that indicate she is about to have a seizure. During his training, Hiro was taught to recognize the subtle signs that Lily displays before a seizure, such as pacing or fidgeting. When Hiro detects these signs, he alerts Lily or a family member by pawing at their leg or barking. Hiro's alerts have helped Lily to avoid potentially dangerous situations, such as falling or having a seizure while alone. Hiro has also become a beloved member of the family, providing Lily with companionship and emotional support. While Shiba Inus are not typically used as seizure detection dogs, Hiro's story shows that with the right training and socialization, any breed of dog can be trained to perform this important role.

We here at Dakine Shiba Inus have several Shiba Inus who have gone on to be excellent Therapy dogs.

2 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Grain Free Diet and DCM?

here is some debate among veterinarians and pet owners regarding the potential health risks associated with a grain-free diet for dogs. On the one hand, proponents of grain-free diets for dogs argue t

Dogs and Bonding with Humans

Dogs bond with people based on various factors, including trust, affection, and consistency of care. They tend to form strong bonds with their primary caregivers and may also form attachments to other

bottom of page